National Teen Driver Safety Week

This is National Teen Driver Safety Week. Here’s some good information from AAA.

Car crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in the United States. Teen drivers are involved in more crashes per mile driven than drivers of any other age group.

Parents play the biggest role in keeping their teens safe behind the wheel. Risky driving, traffic violations and crashes are lower among teens whose parents set limits on their driving privileges.

What better time than during Teen Driver Safety Week to establish a parent-teen driving agreement—having rules and restrictions written down in advance establishes driving as a privilege. Click HERE to download the AAA parent-teen agreement.

We encourage you to visit our teen website, Keys2Drive, for a full range of tools to help you and your teen throughout the learning-to-drive process. Get the information you need on driver education, GDL,   insurance, risks and responsibilities, all in ONE place, TeenDriving.AAA.com.

 

MOST eNews October 2014

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National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month

Especially in the month of October, we remember families that have experienced a loss of one or more of their precious children. In the United States, October 15 of each year is proclaimed as Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day. Lighting a candle at 7pm for one hour, wherever you are, will  create a wave of light around the world!

For more information, articles, resources, offer and receive support and to share memorials visit the MOST Memorial Page, and Bereavement and Loss links.  There are MOST families that have lost one of their babies and others that have lost more than one, even all of them. If you would like to connect with others who have similar circumstances, please contact the MOST office at 631-859-1110, join us on the Family Support Forums, or email Info@MOSTonline.org.

 

 

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Thinking of Halloween yet?M&M trick or treat

Halloween is celebrated by many families this month. There are many terrific photos in the MOST flickr gallery with some cute costume ideas. Perhaps you will see a family you know!

Check them out and PLEASE  share your photos with us!

See more Halloween photos here

 

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Fire Prevention Month

If your children are elementary school age, most likely you will receive many papers and activities about Fire Prevention Month. However, if your children are younger, home-schooled, or in high school or beyond, here  is some information, articles and activities you need to read.  Then National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has a free ebook and app available (geared to ages preK- 5th). On the same page are mazes, games, print outs and downloads about fire and fire safety. ABCteach also has some downloads and print outs on their Fire Safety Month page.

Free articles: Fire Exit Strategies: Plans for 2 or more children

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National Teen Drive Safety Week  Oct 19-25

Help teens drive safe

Keeping our children safe is important for all ages, at home or on the road.   Some teens need more guidance than others.  Not sure what you need to do to help keep your teen safe behind the wheel? Set the rules, make a contract, enforce the consequences.  (remind you of the toddler years?)

The five rules for every drive, can you name them? No Cell Phones, No Extra Passengers, No Speeding, No Alcohol, and Always Buckle-up.

 

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Stories from the Heart Blog   

Check out the recent articles posted on the MOST Stories from the Heart blog. Feel free to share, pin or link your favorites through Twitter, Facebook, by email, or using your favorite social networking site with family members, friends and professionals. Each post has an easy-to-use ‘Share’ button at the bottom. The most recent titles include:
Have an idea for an article you’d like to read about? Have an article to share? Please let us know by contacting Barb at info@mostonline.org
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MOST Membership

What does MOST offer? Some of the programs offered include one-on-one support, the MOST website, in-depth blog articles, advocacy efforts, outreach programs, development and provision of quality resources and more. MOST membership dues allow us to support other families and extend invitations to members for special events. We invite you to join us! Join MOST for one-time only dues of just $45.00.
Already a member? Give a gift membership! Contact the office at 631-859-1110 or email Barb at info@mostonline.org.  Help us spread the word about how economical it is to become a permanent part of MOST’s thriving community of multiple birth families.
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Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day

Today at 7:00 pm in all time zones, families around the United States will light candles in memory all of the precious babies who have been lost during pregnancy or in infancy.  Too many families grieve in silence, sometimes never coming to terms with their loss.

If you or someone you know has suffered a miscarriage, stillbirth or infant loss due to SIDS/SUID, prematurity or other cause, we hope you will join us in this national tribute to create awareness of these tragic infant deaths and provide support to those that are suffering.

More information can be found here.

Musical Pacifiers Help Premature Babies Leave NICUs Faster

One of the things premature babies are given in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) are pacifiers. Pacifiers stimulate and strengthen the babies’ sucking power, which is essential to correct feeding, which is necessary for the babies’ discharge.

A recent study looked at the effect of pacifiers that played recorded versions of lullabies sung by babies’ mothers. They found that babies’ sucking on the pacifiers that played recorded lullabies — the recordings stopped playing when they stopped sucking — led to faster learning of the proper way to feed. “A mother’s voice is a powerful auditory cue,” said study author Dr. Nathalie Maitre, a professor of pediatrics at Vanderbilt University’s School of Medicine. “Babies know and love their mother’s voice. It has proven to be the perfect incentive to help motivate these babies.”

Maitre and her colleagues looked at 94 premature babies, all of whom were born between 34 and 36 weeks of gestation (about 40 weeks is full term), and were healthy except for being fed through a feeding tube. About half of the babies got the prerecorded pacifiers, which played either “Hush Little Baby” or “Snuggle Puppy,” for about 15 minutes each day. Whenever the babies sucked on the pacifiers, they heard their mothers singing.

Although the study only lasted about five days, the results were obvious. Babies who used the pacifiers were off the feeding tubes an average of a week earlier than those who had regular pacifiers. They also consumed more, drinking about two milliliters of fortified breast milk, compared to about one milliliter in the comparison group.

“Premature infants thrive in the home with earlier discharge, parents are relieved to have their babies home from the hospital as soon as possible, and medical costs are greatly reduced,” Jayne M. Standley, the inventor of the musical pacifier, called the PAL, told Reuters. “This study has implications to change NICU treatment for feeding problems of premature infants.”

MOST Family Spotlight

In 2005, Janet found out that she was expecting quadruplets.

“We had such worry for the health of our unborn children and how we would survive once they were born. Our pregnancy was filled with continual medical issues for both me and some of our babies. During my numerous bed rest days of internet surfing, we happily discovered MOST.  The guidance and support that fellow families of multiples gave us was immeasurable.  We have no idea how we could have done it without them.  Throughout our pregnancy and delivery, our seven months in the NICU, and the early infant years, it was especially important.  At the time, the online forums were the way that we would all communicate, and I didn’t quite know how these busy moms found the time to answer our all questions. They genuinely cared. Fast forward a few years, and I became one of those moms, answering questions for newer families.  We are so happy to have met Maureen, the staff, and all of the families at MOST.  THANK YOU!  We could NOT have thrived as well as we did without you.” – Janet

Please help MOST continue to help families like the Janet’s by making a donation online today. Or you may call the MOST office at 631-859-1110. We’d love to hear from you! Thank you.

Read more family stories on our blog.

MOST eNews September 2014

 

 

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Have Scientists Found the Key to Preventing Preeclampsia?

Doctors and scientists have been trying for years to learn what causes preeclampsia, a common complication of pregnancy characterized by high blood pressure and protein in the urine, and a major cause of premature delivery and maternal and fetal deaths. A new study found that molecules that send detrimental signals are abundant in the placentas and umbilical cords of preeclampsia patients.

During pregnancy, the placenta functions like a trading post of sorts: Inside the pancake-shaped organ, maternal and fetal blood is trucked through, nutrients and oxygen are delivered to the developing fetus, and waste products are shipped out for disposal. All of that life-sustaining traffic requires a multitude of molecular signals, and the study zeroed in on the bad signals that may be involved in preeclampsia.

Researchers compared protein levels in samples from placentas and umbilical cords of 10 women who had experienced preeclampsia and 10 who had not. They found that proteins that signal both cell stress and cell death were significantly higher in samples taken from the women who had experienced preeclampsia. The researchers say that the increase in those factors could reduce nutrient transport and send bad signals to the maternal vascular system, which circulates blood. These circulating factors may also pass the placental barrier and affect the fetus.

In addition to analyzing which molecules were more pronounced in preeclampsia, the researchers looked at the effects of the syndrome on study participants’ babies. They found that the average hospital stay for preeclampsia babies was significantly longer: Those newborns stayed six days on average, while the babies born to mothers without preeclampsia stayed a little over three days on average.

Now that the molecular signal problems have been discovered, the focus will shift to finding ways to therapeutically block them one day to prevent preeclampsia.

Full story.                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Annals of Internal Medicine article Sept 2014 Low-Dose Aspirin Use for the Prevention of Morbidity and Mortality From Preeclampsia: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

 

Teaching Kids Not to Bully

It can be shocking and upsetting to learn that your child has gotten in trouble for picking on others or been labeled a bully.

As difficult as it may be to process this news, it’s important to deal with it right away. Whether the bullying is physical or verbal, if it’s not stopped it can lead to more aggressive antisocial behavior and interfere with your child’s success in school and ability to form and sustain friendships.

Read these tips from our friends at KidsHealth to help understand bullying behavior and ways to stop it.

From our library: When Your Child is the Victim of a Bully

Smoking when Pregnant May Lead to Behavior Problems in Kids

Most people know that smoking during pregnancy is a bad idea. The CDC warns that smoking during pregnancy can increase the likelihood of a miscarriage, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), and certain birth defects like a cleft lip or palate, and premature birth.

New research, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Psychiatry in July, is adding “conduct disorders” to that list of health risks. Mothers who smoked during pregnancy were more likely to have children who had behavioral issues, the study found.

“The evidence is emerging that smoking in pregnancy and the frequency of smoking in pregnancy is correlated with developmental outcomes after (children) are born,” senior author Gordon Harold, professor of developmental psychopathology at the University of Leicester in England, said.

The CDC estimates that 13 percent of women smoked during their last three months of pregnancy. A 2012 survey conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) showed that an even higher amount, 21.8 percent of white women aged 15 to 44, smoked while pregnant. Black and Hispanic women’s rates lingered around 14.2 and 6.5 percent respectively.

Read more.

MOST eNews August 2014 End of Summer

 

 

 

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Next Stop Adulthood: Tips for Parents

With high school and college beginning soon, here are some things for parents of older children to keep in mind from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Becoming a young adult is exciting, difficult, and scary for both parents and teens. It is a time of increasing independence and change, no matter what the situation.

For example:

World Breastfeeding Week

August 1st – 7th is World Breastfeeding Week. This year’s theme: Breastfeeding: A Winning Goal – For Life! asserts the importance of increasing and sustaining the protection, promotion and support of breastfeeding.

MOST has several resources available to families who want to breastfeed their multiples.

Infant Multiples & Breastfeeding Combination Packet

Breastfeeding Higher Order Multiples

You Can Breastfeed Your Multiples

MOST Family Spotlight

Seven and a half years ago Keira’s triplet daughters were born at 25 weeks 5 days with a combined birth weight of just 4lbs 4oz.

“This was my first and only pregnancy and I was terrified.  The first few weeks, of what would ultimately be 291 days in the NICU, were simply a blur as I dealt with the shock of such an early and traumatic delivery.  Two of my girls faired pretty well, all things considered.  My third seemed to bear the brunt of their extremely preterm birth.  No one expected her to live the first few days but weeks passed and she defied the odds, my worries switched from whether or not she would live to what kind of life she would have.  Would she walk and talk?  Would she go to school, play sports or dance?  Or would the issues she was facing as an infant prohibit her from living a “typical” life.

MOST connected me with another mom whose support gave me hope.  Her situation mirrored mine in several ways, with one of her boys struggling far worse than the other two.  She was three years down the road and talking with her, hearing that the unknown is scary but it could be handled and that I would come out stronger than I ever knew, that is what got me through.  Maybe I would not have the family I envisioned with three healthy children running around my home, but we would be a family.  We might be carting around an oxygen tank and a feeding bag or two, but you learn, you adapt and you realize that there is always hope, no matter what the ultimate outcome may be.

Hope was the greatest gift I could have been given and even when we did ultimately lose my daughter at 14 months old, I thought I didn’t belong in the HOM community anymore.  I didn’t feel like a twin mom either and honestly considered dropping out of my same age triplet group.  But it was the MOST community that continued to embrace me, lift me up and reminded me that I still was and always would be a triplet mom.” – Keira

After her daughter’s death, Keira was connected to MOST’s Lost Angels, a private support group for families who have experienced a loss to help them through their time of grief.

Please help MOST continue to help families like the Keira’s by making a donation online today. Or you may call the MOST office at 631-859-1110. We’d love to hear from you! Thank you.

MOST eNews July 2014

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The Importance of Family Routines

Why are family routines so important to children?

Every family needs routines. They help to organize life and keep it from becoming too chaotic. Children do best when routines are regular, predictable, and consistent.

One of a family’s greatest challenges is to establish comfortable, effective routines, which should achieve a happy compromise between the disorder and confusion that can occur without them, and the rigidity and boredom that can come with too much structure and regimentation, where children are given no choice and little flexibility.

Continue reading The Importance of Family Routines