PPD and Gestational Diabetes Information

It’s National Women’s Health Week.  Here are some resources for Post-Partum Depression and Gestational Diabetes, two health issues especially important for multiples moms.

Research shows that PPD affects 10-20% of all new mothers and generally occurs within the first year following delivery peaking between 10-14 weeks. According to a 2003 MOST survey on PPD, PPD appears not only to affect a higher percentage of higher-order multiple birth mothers, 29%, but may occur at a later time, as late as 18 months to 3 years post-delivery, and go undiagnosed and untreated in a significant percentage of new mothers of multiples.

MOST Resources

http://postpartumprogress.org/

As you know, some women get diabetes when they are pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after the babies are born. Even if the diabetes goes away, you still have a greater chance of getting diabetes later in life. Your children may also have a greater chance of being obese and getting type 2 diabetes later in life. Use this tip sheet to learn what you can do for yourself and your children.

MOST eNews May 2014

 

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Continue reading MOST eNews May 2014

Atlanta Round Up: Thanks to Business that Donated

All gifts

 The Atlanta MOM Weekend Gathering was FUN FUN FUN! (and for some of us FUN x4 or FUN x5) .Wonderful businesses and individuals donated items, food products, and discount coupons.  Here are the companies that donated.

Please visit and LIKE  their Facebook page or website to Thank them. Continue reading Atlanta Round Up: Thanks to Business that Donated To MOMS Gathering

Volunteer Cuddlers Boost Preemie Health

It’s well established that newborns benefit from touch. But in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) it’s more difficult to give newborns the nurturing contact they need because of the wires, equipment and incubators helping them survive. That’s where the cuddlers come in. Volunteers are working at hospitals around the country cuddling premature newborns who cannot go home yet.

When nurses are swamped with other patients and parents cannot make it to the hospital, grandmas, empty-nesters, college students and other volunteers step in. They hold the babies, swaddle them, sing and coo to them, rock them, and treat them as if they were their own.

NICUs are noisy, stressful environments. There are babies born extremely prematurely, or with birth defects and other illnesses. Some are too sick to be held – but not too sick to touch. Cuddlers reach a finger inside their incubators and stroke tiny bare bellies.

“You can see them calm, you can see their heart rate drop, you can see their little brows relax,” said Kathleen Jones, 52, a cuddler at the Chicago hospital. “They’re fighting so hard and they’re undergoing all this medical drama and trauma. My heart breaks for them a little bit.”

Jones used to wonder why parents or other relatives aren’t comforting their own babies. But then, in August, her youngest grandchild was born deaf, with brain damage doctors say was caused by a virus her mom contracted before birth. The baby spent her first three weeks at Comer, and got cuddling care while she was there.

While family members visited often, “life happens and you can’t sit by a bedside for three weeks,” Jones said.

Jones’ daughter had had a C-section, and already had her hands full with a toddler at home. “She was being held and loved and watched over,” she said. “I felt a great sense of relief from that.”

Parents typically must consent for their babies to be part of cuddling programs, and cuddlers must undergo background checks and training before starting the job. At Chicago’s Comer hospital, that includes lessons in how to swaddle babies tight to make them feel safe and how to maneuver around intravenous lines, as well as instruction in hygiene including frequent hand-washing.

Other cuddling services for preemies exist throughout the country. Contact your local hospital.

Full Story. Please also see : NICU Care; Infant Massage; NICU FAQ’s

Triplets' Sausage Recipe Wins Contest

Triplets have come up with a sizzling sausage recipe that will feed their school pals.

Nine-year-olds Archie, Charlotte and Flynn Roberts were invited to see their creation – the “Ardingly Tripolata” – produced after designing a recipe to mark British Sausage Week.

A competition was held at their school, Ardingly Prep, where pupils were challenged with dreaming up a new flavour of sausage. Their winning entry was then created by Lingfield butchers’ CMB Foods and will be added to their school menu.

Each team of would-be chefs gave a presentation to explain why they had chosen the ingredients they had and it was left to headmaster Chris Calvey to pick the tastiest. But you won’t be able to recreate the winning recipe – as the triplets are keeping some of their ingredients a secret.

Archie said: “We had a fantastic couple of hours learning the process of sausage making. It was epic! It is amazing to think that we have created new sausages.” Charlotte added: “When we held the first sausages to be finished they were so slimy.” Pupils at Ardingly College got their first taste of the winning sausages on Friday.

The college’s catering manager Jo Davis said: “The triplets produced a poster describing their sausage which was a work of art. It was hand drawn and it featured a picture of a sausage wearing a hat and holding a spoon and it concluded that it was ‘probably the best sausage in the world ever.”

“They had grand plans containing hard-boiled egg and for it to be wrapped in bacon as they wanted an all-in-one breakfast sausage. However, it had to be a bit simpler when it was made. They all sat around the kitchen table and decided upon the name and ingredients together. The prize was not known to the children until they found out they had won.”

10 Steps to Face the Tears & Fears Associated with Immunizations

Because it’s National Infant Immunization Week, we thought we’d share some tips from one of our members, the mother of 4 boys, including triplets.

In this article she provides a very detailed checklist of coping strategies to help young children handle the pain and fear associated with immunizations and other shots. You can gain a repertoire of techniques from dealing with the anticipation, distraction exercises, and even how to handle the aftermath.

We hope you find this and the other resources below helpful!

10 Steps to Face the Tears & Fears Associated with Immunizations

Study on Pain Reduction During Immunizations

Immunization Schedules from the CDC

MOST eNews April 2014 Ah Spring

  • April is Multiple Birth Awareness Month- How Many Babies???     
  •                - Autism Awareness Month
  •                - Child Abuse Prevention Month – How you can help prevent
  • NYC : MOST Moms Gathering
  • Stories from the Heart blog  Check out the new blogs!
  • MOST Membership - Help other parents

 

Family in spring Continue reading MOST eNews April 2014 Ah Spring

Premature Birth Linked to Higher Insulin Levels in Children

Babies born prematurely may suffer an increased risk of diabetes later in life, according to research conducted at Johns Hopkins University. The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, surveyed data on 1,358 babies whose insulin levels were checked at birth and later in life.

“The effect is greater the earlier the baby is born, possibly because whatever induced the preterm labor may have altered the settings of the baby’s pancreas-control system,” said study co-author Mark Hanson.

“We could identify babies potentially at risk right from birth and alert pediatricians and parents to pay more attention to future risk of metabolic disease,” said study co-author Dr. Xiaobin Wang.

Full article

5 Things You Should Never Say to a Parent of Multiples

Jill Covyeou is the mother of triplets and a younger singleton.  She is an Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy at Ferris State University College of Pharmacy.  She has been a MOST member since 2010.

A few months ago I was approached by a colleague to write an article Continue reading 5 Things You Should Never Say to a Parent of Multiples

Coping with a Diagnoses-Our Story

Jeanette, mom of triplets, shares her experience of having all three children diagnosed on the autism spectrum.  She shares her emotions and coping through those first few years. 

My husband Chris and I were lucky enough to have relatively healthy 30 week triplets Rachel, Kirsten, and Dylan. We went through the “normal” preemie problems, and thought that we were home free when they reached 1 year of age hitting most of their developmental milestones. Little did we know what we were in for!  Continue reading Coping with a Diagnoses-Our Story

Kindergarten - To Separate or Not? One Family's Experience

My triplets are third graders now, but when they were in preschool we faced the question of whether they should be together or in separate classes for kindergarten and beyond. From the time they were infants, I had felt that we would probably try to keep them together to ease the transition into kindergarten, and then separate them after that. I kept an open mind, however, and paid attention to my children’s developing personalities, strengths, and needs. I also did some research into the subject, reading about other families’ experiences. I read MOST’s statement of their position that it should be a joint decision of the school personnel and the family. As a teacher, I believed that the “right” choice is different for each family, based on their children’s situations, as well as things like school size and the logistics of grouping.

When the final year of preschool was underway, I talked with my kids’ teacher, asking whether they got along in class, if any of them seemed dependent on a sibling, if they played with other kids. The teacher said my trio occasionally played together, but usually chose to play with other friends in the class. They got along with each other, but were fine independently as well. My husband and I felt that keeping them together would make kindergarten easier for all of us. Five-year-olds have a hard time understanding why they have more homework than their sister, or why only one of them was invited to a party. Communication with just one kindergarten teacher was another thing that appealed to me.

Having heard that the administration believed multiples should be separated, we “did our homework” so we would be able to present solid reasons for wanting our children together in one class for their first year. Our request was granted, and I feel it was the best approach for our family. After kindergarten, the kids were placed in separate classes, a decision we approved. For our children, it was important for them to gain some individuality in separate classes. Our daughters look very much alike, so we didn’t want them hearing, “Which one are you?” every day. Our son needed the opportunity to be his own person, not to have his sisters jump in and speak for him before he had a chance to decide what he wanted to say or do.

My husband and I are both educators, so we are perhaps more comfortable speaking our minds about issues regarding our children’s schooling. Even so, knowing MOST’s policy gave me extra confidence as we met with school officials. I printed it out and brought it along, just in case! Now, four years later, I am glad we had a say in our children’s classroom placements. I am also grateful for MOST’s research and family discussion forums which helped me become knowledgeable about the topic before we had to make and defend our decision. – Eileen Raff

 

Read MOST’s Classroom Placement Policy Statement and list of states with legislation.

Bacteria a Major Cause of Premature Birth

A major cause of premature birth, thinning membranes around the baby that eventually tear, may be caused by specific bacteria according to new research.

Early rupture of membranes, also known as PROM (Premature Rupture of Membranes), causes almost a third of all premature births. Researchers at Duke University School of Medicine have found high numbers of bacteria at the site where membranes rupture, which are linked with the thinning of membranes.

If the bacteria are the cause rather than the consequence of early membrane rupture, it may be possible to develop new treatments or screen for women at risk, they say.

Study author Amy Murtha, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Duke University School of Medicine, said: “For instance, if we think that certain bacteria are associated with premature rupturing of the membranes, we can screen for this bacteria early in pregnancy.”

“We then might be able to treat affected women with antibiotics and reduce their risk for PROM. Our research is several steps away from this, but it gives us opportunities to explore potential targeted therapeutic interventions, which we lack in obstetrics.”

Read more.

You can find out more about PROM and how it relates to multiple birth deliveries on MOST’s Supertwins Statistics page.

Massachusetts Triplets Determined to Curb Distracted Driving

These triplets are making a difference. Way to go Salit brothers!

We first told you about the Salit triplets after they hosted a distracted driving event last May at the Statehouse in Boston, Massachusetts. Now they’re promoting a distracted driving summit in Seekonk in March. Continue reading Massachusetts Triplets Determined to Curb Distracted Driving

MOST eNews March 2014

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Endometriosis Awareness Month

 An estimated 200+ million women have endometriosis. This is about 15% of all women. Endometriosis is the biggest cause of infertility in women. Did you know it takes  7-10 years to diagnose for many women?   The first world wide endometriosis march will be held March 13 in Washington DC  and around the world.

Endometriosis.org

Short video about endometriosis symptoms and treatments

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Daylight Savings Timedaylight savings time

It’s that time of year…time to spring forward the clocks. This Sunday at 2am, the clock springs forward to 3 am.  Many children adjust easily but don’t be dismayed if yours do not!  Most families adjust the schedule by 15 min increments over the course of a few days.

How much sleep do your children need? Look at Are Your Kids Getting Enough Sleep?

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Adopt a Family  - A very gracious thank you

Again, thank you all for the generosity given to the MOST Adopt A Family program.  Here is a special note from one of the adopted families.

I am writing as the tears are still in my eyes from opening the box of gifts for my kids from our anonymous angel family. Thank you whoever you are. Things were so hard this year that I had not realized that I had forgotten my Verizon bill until after I had gotten a few gifts for the kids. So for the first time in 5o years my phone was disconnected. I went through bags of carefully chosen toys tonight and realized that even though I had spent more money than I should have, it does not go far with 4 kids, so two boys were only getting 2 gifts for them. Yes they will undoubtedly share everything, but I just felt like a horrible mother. The boys being autistic really will be thrilled to get anything and not connect it to a special day, but this is the first year that my 6 yo daughter has been looking forward to Christmas.

I am still trying to wrap my head around the time, love and effort that a stranger blessed my kids with. Thank you for helping a mom feel better this holiday whoever you are and to all those at MOST that makes things like this  possible.

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MOST MOMS Weekend

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Time to start thinking of the MOST MOM Weekend. This gathering of moms usually occurs in July. Last year in Atlanta was lots of fun. Fun time together, being with others who “get” you.

Willing to help plan? Let Diane know at Diane@mostonline.org.

Where should we go?   NYC?   Chicago?  Hope you can come join us.   We have interest in NYC. Any where else?

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Stories from the Heart Blog   

Check out the recent articles posted on the MOST Stories from the Heart blog. Feel free to share, pin or link your favorites through Twitter, Facebook, by email, or using your favorite social networking site with family members, friends and professionals. Each post has an easy-to-use ‘Share’ button at the bottom. The most recent titles include:
Have an idea for an article you’d like to read about? Have an article to share? Please let us know by contacting Barb at info@mostonline.org

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MOST Membership

What does MOST offer? Some of the programs offered include one-on-one support, the MOST website, in-depth blog articles, advocacy efforts, outreach programs, development and provision of quality resources and more. MOST membership dues allow us to support other families and extend invitations to members for special events. We invite you to join us! Join MOST for one-time only dues of just $45.00.
Already a member? Give a gift membership! Contact the office at 631-859-1110 or email Barb at info@mostonline.org.  Help us spread the word about how economical it is to become a permanent part of MOST’s thriving community of multiple birth families.
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Common Administrative Policy Enforcing Twin Separation

New Research Report Challenges Common Administrative Policy Enforcing Twin Separation in Kindergarten

A comprehensive new research report published this week in Educational Policy reveals that kindergarten separation is traumatic for many young twins and confirms that many school principals separate twins in school against the wishes of both the children and their parents. This investigation by Dr. Lynn Melby Gordon at California State University, Northridge is the first study to explore the separation of twins in kindergarten by directly comparing and examining the beliefs of elementary principals, kindergarten teachers, parents, and twins. Continue reading Common Administrative Policy Enforcing Twin Separation