World Breastfeeding Week

August 1st – 7th is World Breastfeeding Week. This year’s theme: Breastfeeding: A Winning Goal – For Life! asserts the importance of increasing and sustaining the protection, promotion and support of breastfeeding.

MOST has several resources available to families who want to breastfeed their multiples.

Infant Multiples & Breastfeeding Combination Packet

Breastfeeding Higher Order Multiples

You Can Breastfeed Your Multiples

MOST Family Spotlight

Seven and a half years ago Keira’s triplet daughters were born at 25 weeks 5 days with a combined birth weight of just 4lbs 4oz.

“This was my first and only pregnancy and I was terrified.  The first few weeks, of what would ultimately be 291 days in the NICU, were simply a blur as I dealt with the shock of such an early and traumatic delivery.  Two of my girls faired pretty well, all things considered.  My third seemed to bear the brunt of their extremely preterm birth.  No one expected her to live the first few days but weeks passed and she defied the odds, my worries switched from whether or not she would live to what kind of life she would have.  Would she walk and talk?  Would she go to school, play sports or dance?  Or would the issues she was facing as an infant prohibit her from living a “typical” life.

MOST connected me with another mom whose support gave me hope.  Her situation mirrored mine in several ways, with one of her boys struggling far worse than the other two.  She was three years down the road and talking with her, hearing that the unknown is scary but it could be handled and that I would come out stronger than I ever knew, that is what got me through.  Maybe I would not have the family I envisioned with three healthy children running around my home, but we would be a family.  We might be carting around an oxygen tank and a feeding bag or two, but you learn, you adapt and you realize that there is always hope, no matter what the ultimate outcome may be.

Hope was the greatest gift I could have been given and even when we did ultimately lose my daughter at 14 months old, I thought I didn’t belong in the HOM community anymore.  I didn’t feel like a twin mom either and honestly considered dropping out of my same age triplet group.  But it was the MOST community that continued to embrace me, lift me up and reminded me that I still was and always would be a triplet mom.” – Keira

After her daughter’s death, Keira was connected to MOST’s Lost Angels, a private support group for families who have experienced a loss to help them through their time of grief.

Please help MOST continue to help families like the Keira’s by making a donation online today. Or you may call the MOST office at 631-859-1110. We’d love to hear from you! Thank you.

MOST eNews July 2014

Continue reading MOST eNews July 2014

The Importance of Family Routines

Why are family routines so important to children?

Every family needs routines. They help to organize life and keep it from becoming too chaotic. Children do best when routines are regular, predictable, and consistent.

One of a family’s greatest challenges is to establish comfortable, effective routines, which should achieve a happy compromise between the disorder and confusion that can occur without them, and the rigidity and boredom that can come with too much structure and regimentation, where children are given no choice and little flexibility.

Continue reading The Importance of Family Routines

Do Active Moms = Active Kids?

Researchers at England’s University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, launched a study to build on other research into how the physical activity of mothers and their kids are connected.

Parents seem to affect their kids’ physical activities in three ways — by acting as role models, by helping kids be active (by taking them to the park, for instance), and by being active with them. “All three aspects are thought to be important,” Esther van Sluijs, group leader, said, “but it has generally been unclear how directly mother and child’s physical activity are related.”

In the study, the researchers used devices called accelerometers to track 554 children, all 4 years old, and their mothers for as many as seven days. “The more activity a mother did, the more active her child,” van Sluijs noted.

Specifically, for every single minute of moderate-to-vigorous activity that the mother did, her child was more likely to do 10 percent more of a similar level of activity. Those extra minutes add up over time, according to researchers.

“If activity in mothers and children can be encouraged or incorporated into daily activities so that more time is spent moving, activity levels are likely to increase in both,” van Sluijs said. “In return, this is likely to have long-term health benefits for both.”

Another expert focused on the issue of fathers and what role they might play.

“This is a big question not addressed here,” said Leann Birch, a professor at the University of Georgia’s department of foods and nutrition who studies children and obesity. But, she said, research on parenting suggests that fathers tend to engage in more rough-and-tumble and high-action play with kids than mothers.

Also, she said, “some of our own work showed that reported activity by dads was more important than by moms in predicting the activity of daughters, especially in organized sports during later childhood.”

Adapted from an article in Medline Plus.

MOST Family Spotlight

Bill was caught between jubilation and terror when he learned he and his wife were going to have triplets. He had a lot of questions and was very concerned about his wife’s health and how they were going to manage their miracles after delivery.

The doctor referred Bill to MOST, a place where his questions could be answered and his first-time dad and triplet dad fears could be eased. Everyone at MOST “has been fully invested in the well-being of my wife, daughters, and us as a family.”

“We felt very prepared when we had our NICU tour due to our conversations with MOST and the information that we read in the MOST book. My wife and I are truly grateful for everything that you have done for our daughters and us.”

Please help MOST continue to help families like the Bill’s by making a donation online today. Or you may call the MOST office at 631-859-1110. We’d love to hear from you! Thank you.

MOST’s book, Expecting Multiples: The Most Comprehensive Guide to High-risk Twin & All Triplet, Quadruplet or More Pregnancies, is available at Amazon.com.

Early-warning System for Preterm Labor in Development

The following is adapted from Erin Allday’s article in the San Francisco Chronicle, March 19, 2014.

A team of University of California, San Francisco, obstetricians and bioengineers is building a wireless device that can be inserted into a pregnant woman’s vagina to monitor her cervix and, when necessary, send an alert that the woman may be going into premature labor.

The device, which will be similar in size and shape to a diaphragm used for birth control, would be the first early-warning system for preterm labor, which is the main cause of death among newborns worldwide.

It’s still in early development, but the device, called the Smart Diaphragm, just got $2.7 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to start manufacturing and expand clinical trials. A prototype has been tested in about 15 pregnant women at UCSF, and a larger study is planned for this summer.

“We need a way to have an early heads up – who needs to be seen by a doctor, who needs surveillance. That’s what drove us,” said Dr. Larry Rand, an obstetrician and the lead developer of the diaphragm.

“For 30 years, we’ve been doing research on preventing preterm birth,” Rand said. “But we’ve been focusing too much on the uterus and the contractions, and that’s sort of like trying to treat a heart attack after someone has chest pains.”

Monitoring the cervix at a molecular level, he said, may be the answer. Rand believes the cervix may be critical for understanding preterm birth because it undergoes subtle molecular changes a long time – weeks, perhaps- before labor begins.

When preterm labor is detected now – either because a woman has started having contractions or because an ultrasound has detected a change in the size or shape of her cervix – it’s usually so far advanced that there aren’t many options for doctors to stop it.

The cervix softens when the collagen starts to break up. Ordinarily, collagen forms a tight crisscross pattern, like a basket weave, that keeps the cervical tissue stiff. But something causes that basket weave to loosen.

Rand’s device cups the cervix and monitors the collagen, ideally revealing when the basket weave starts to come undone. The device is embedded with two types of sensors – one to monitor electric currents moving through the cervical tissue, and one to monitor fluorescent light. As collagen breaks down, electrical currents move more easily through the tissue and the tissue bounces back light in a different pattern.

“We’re measuring multiple times throughout pregnancy. We’re getting in essence a virtual biopsy of the cervix,” said Mozziyar Etemadi, a postdoctoral bioengineer from UCSF and UC Berkeley who’s working with Rand on building the diaphragm. “This wasn’t possible even 10 years ago. The tools that we’re using didn’t exist – the electronics and the wireless connectivity were not there.”

The idea is to insert the diaphragm into a woman’s vagina at some point early in the pregnancy to get a baseline reading on her cervix. Then, the woman would reinsert the diaphragm periodically during pregnancy – maybe every few days or so – to get more readings.

The data would be transmitted wirelessly to cloud storage, where it would be accessible by the patient and doctors. If her collagen structure was changing enough to raise concern, an alert would go out, either to the patient or her doctor, or both.

MOST eNews June 2014

 

week167 Continue reading MOST eNews June 2014 Summertime

Getting Out With Toddler Quadruplets

Going out of the house with multiples? Considering doing this? Read how Amber manages to get out of the house with her quadruplets.

When all four of our babies were finally discharged from the NICU, I wondered when and if we would ever take them all out anywhere.  They were so fragile that fears of returning to the NICU were painfully apparent, and hard to shake.  As the babies grew and thrived, we began itching to take them places.  Part of the fun of having a new baby is taking them out to explore the world, right?   Aside from adventures, there’s always the reality of what must be accomplished outside the home, say grocery shopping and doctor’s appointments to name a few.  Continue reading Getting Out With Toddler Multiples

Fathers are Key to Breastfeeding Success

A woman’s decision to breastfeed typically occurs long before labor and delivery. But her commitment to carry through frequently hinges on the opinion of someone often overlooked in breastfeeding education—the baby’s father.

“If the father is indifferent, the mother will breastfeed some of the time, but when the father is pro-breastfeeding, she will breastfeed almost all of the time2,” says Muswamba Mwamba, IBCLC, a peer dad coordinator at the City of Dallas Woman, Infants and Children Program (WIC) Program.

A father’s participation in the decision to breastfeed, his awareness of the health benefits for mom and baby and his approval are critical to a mother breastfeeding after leaving the hospital, particularly for women with lower incomes.

That’s why the city of Dallas is investing resources in programs that include fathers in breastfeeding education, such as its Peer Dad Program. The Peer Dad initiative pairs future fathers—identified through women receiving services in the clinic—with WIC-trained peer mentors, all fathers of breastfed babies whose partners were enrolled in WIC. The peer dads are trained to inform, coach and offer support.

“Breastfeeding can be difficult for a mom in the beginning,” says Deborah Parnell, breastfeeding coordinator for the City of Dallas WIC Program. “This is when dads can be most helpful and where education received in the Peer Dads program can make a difference; making dads aware of ways they can help mom and make the process easier.”

Read more.

Aquarium Pump CPAP Saves Lives

Students from Rice University in Houston, Texas, have designed a very low cost CPAP machine using aquarium pumps. Their device has increased the survival rate of infants with respiratory distress from 44% to 71% in Malawi, the country with the highest premature birth rate in the world, according to the World Health Organization.

A typical Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine can cost more than $6,000. The Rice students’ machine can be manufactured for about $350, which is a tremendous benefit for hospitals in poor countries.

In Malawi, when a newborn is having trouble breathing, extra oxygen tubes are placed in the baby’s nose. But no air pressure is added to help inflate the infant’s lungs. All countries treated respiratory distress this way until the CPAP was invented in the 1970’s. With a CPAP machine, gentle air pressure is pushed through the tubes into the nostrils and/or mouth to help facilitate breathing.

Doctors know it takes very little air pressure to help newborns breathe. The Rice students found that two aquarium pumps provided the perfect amount of pressure for tiny lungs. Their machine is also easily portable. The original prototype was housed in a shoebox.

So far the aquarium pump CPAPs have been introduced in nine government hospitals in Malawi and plans are underway to expand into private hospitals and other countries.

Read more.

PPD and Gestational Diabetes Information

It’s National Women’s Health Week.  Here are some resources for Post-Partum Depression and Gestational Diabetes, two health issues especially important for multiples moms.

Research shows that PPD affects 10-20% of all new mothers and generally occurs within the first year following delivery peaking between 10-14 weeks. According to a 2003 MOST survey on PPD, PPD appears not only to affect a higher percentage of higher-order multiple birth mothers, 29%, but may occur at a later time, as late as 18 months to 3 years post-delivery, and go undiagnosed and untreated in a significant percentage of new mothers of multiples.

MOST Resources

http://postpartumprogress.org/

As you know, some women get diabetes when they are pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after the babies are born. Even if the diabetes goes away, you still have a greater chance of getting diabetes later in life. Your children may also have a greater chance of being obese and getting type 2 diabetes later in life. Use this tip sheet to learn what you can do for yourself and your children.

MOST eNews May 2014

 

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Atlanta Round Up: Thanks to Business that Donated

All gifts

 The Atlanta MOM Weekend Gathering was FUN FUN FUN! (and for some of us FUN x4 or FUN x5) .Wonderful businesses and individuals donated items, food products, and discount coupons.  Here are the companies that donated.

Please visit and LIKE  their Facebook page or website to Thank them. Continue reading Atlanta Round Up: Thanks to Business that Donated To MOMS Gathering

Volunteer Cuddlers Boost Preemie Health

It’s well established that newborns benefit from touch. But in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) it’s more difficult to give newborns the nurturing contact they need because of the wires, equipment and incubators helping them survive. That’s where the cuddlers come in. Volunteers are working at hospitals around the country cuddling premature newborns who cannot go home yet.

When nurses are swamped with other patients and parents cannot make it to the hospital, grandmas, empty-nesters, college students and other volunteers step in. They hold the babies, swaddle them, sing and coo to them, rock them, and treat them as if they were their own.

NICUs are noisy, stressful environments. There are babies born extremely prematurely, or with birth defects and other illnesses. Some are too sick to be held – but not too sick to touch. Cuddlers reach a finger inside their incubators and stroke tiny bare bellies.

“You can see them calm, you can see their heart rate drop, you can see their little brows relax,” said Kathleen Jones, 52, a cuddler at the Chicago hospital. “They’re fighting so hard and they’re undergoing all this medical drama and trauma. My heart breaks for them a little bit.”

Jones used to wonder why parents or other relatives aren’t comforting their own babies. But then, in August, her youngest grandchild was born deaf, with brain damage doctors say was caused by a virus her mom contracted before birth. The baby spent her first three weeks at Comer, and got cuddling care while she was there.

While family members visited often, “life happens and you can’t sit by a bedside for three weeks,” Jones said.

Jones’ daughter had had a C-section, and already had her hands full with a toddler at home. “She was being held and loved and watched over,” she said. “I felt a great sense of relief from that.”

Parents typically must consent for their babies to be part of cuddling programs, and cuddlers must undergo background checks and training before starting the job. At Chicago’s Comer hospital, that includes lessons in how to swaddle babies tight to make them feel safe and how to maneuver around intravenous lines, as well as instruction in hygiene including frequent hand-washing.

Other cuddling services for preemies exist throughout the country. Contact your local hospital.

Full Story. Please also see : NICU Care; Infant Massage; NICU FAQ’s