70. Will my multiples be each other's best friend?

Just like other sibling relationships, some multiple birth children will grow-up to be best friends, and some do not. Since multiples share many similar experiences, they often learn to truly enjoy each other’s companionship. They may, because of exposure, develop similar interests which can also help to nurture their relationship. Same sex siblings tend to grow closer after age five than siblings of opposite gender multiples, and this bond may be even stronger with identical multiples, especially females.

However, just like in any other relationship, multiples will experience times as they grow and mature when they may need learn and grow individually, or deal with situations in their own way. They may even develop conflict with their siblings as they go through the process of discovering who they are as an individual who is separate from their multiple birth siblings as well as apart from their family. Pre-adolescence is a common developmental stage for this to occur. As a parent, keep in mind this process is all quite normal and not at all unexpected. In time, they may return once again to being each other’s best friend, because multiples share a very unique bond regardless of how their relationship matures.

 

Resources

 

For more information on this and other related topics check out our collection of articles on school-age topics and our School Age article bundle.

Also see the MOST By the Stages School-Age page and School-age multiples links.

Read articles on school-age multiples on the MOST Stories from the Heart blog.

Fun for all ages of multiples is MOST Jr.

 

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